Poster-4

About Consent is Sexy Campaign: Frequently Asked Questions

If you would like to get the campaign for your college - please contact us.

For more info - check out our FAQs below: just click on the questions. If you have questions not addressed here - please contact us.

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What is Consent is Sexy?

Consent is Sexy is essentially a Sexual Rights Awareness campaign, targeting students in High Schools, Colleges and Universities.

It promotes:

  • The awareness and practise of respect, consent and open discussion;
  • Responsible, safer sex; sexual health and emotional well-being; and
  • Gender equality and equality of rights in relationships.

It counters:

  • Interpersonal and relationship abuse, sexual assault, intimate partner rape and acquaintance or date rape;
  • Gender discrimination and homophobia.

What are the Goals of Consent is Sexy?

It is Unrealistic to expect:

  • All deeply ingrained negative attitudes and behaviour to suddenly and completely disappear - as the result of the campaign.


It is Realistic to expect:

  • Students who are destined to be very influential in society - our next generation of leaders - to gain an increased understanding and appreciation of the principles and practise of Respect, Consent and Open Discussion.

It is Realistic to expect:

  • Students more informed about their Sexual Rights; and more spacious and confident at negotiating boundaries and resolving differences in their intimate and other relationships through open, respectful communication.

It is Realistic to expect:

  • An increased awareness and understanding of the destructiveness of gender prejudice, how to recognise it and counter it in yourself and in others.


As a result, it is Realistic to expect:

  • Reduced levels of disrepectful and abusive attitudes and behaviour
  • Reduced levels of interpersonal and relationship conflict and abuse
  • Reduced levels of sexual assault and rape

What are the Consent is Sexy Modules?

The CIS Campaign includes the following modules:

  • Skills Training Workshop: prepares a team of students to ‘take ownership’ of the campaign - to creatively collaborate, plan, organize and roll-it out.
  • Information Campaign: consists of Posters (currently 20 different messages with more than 50 different image choices), Leaflet and Website.
  • Promotional Campaign: consists Banners, Display Stands, T-Shirt designs, Buttons, Bookmarks, Viral campaign, etc.
  • Interactive Events: consists of themed event ideas designed to create excitement and participation: Open Debates, Slam Poetry, Guerilla Theatre, Competitions, Voting Events, Flash Mobs, Film Festival, ChangeMakers, etc.
  • Impact Assessment Report: templates for collecting feedback on all aspects of the campaign, and extracting data that demonstrates the impact of the Campaign.

Why is Consent is Sexy Effective?

It’s Tested

More than 700 students have been polled for feedback.

  • When asked, “Rate the CIS campaign Posters and Leaflets”
          83% of all students polled responded “GOOD” or “GREAT”
  • When asked, “Will the CIS Campaign be effective in creating change?”
          89% of all students polled responded “YES”
  • When asked, “Rate the CiS Skills Training Workshop”
          97% of all students polled responded “GOOD” or “GREAT”
  • When asked, “Do you feel confident, having completed the workshop, you can successfully roll-out this campaign?”
          96% of all students polled responded “YES”


It’s Comprehensive.

The CIS Campaign includes the following modules:

  • Skills Training Workshop: prepares a team of students to ‘take ownership’ of the campaign - to creatively collaborate, plan, organise and roll-it out.
  • Information Campaign: consists of Posters - currently more than 20 different messages, and more than 50 different images to choose from, Leaflet and Website.
  • Promotional Campaign: consists of Banners, Display Stands, T-Shirt designs, Buttons, Bookmarks, Viral campaign, etc.
  • Interactive Events: consists of themed events designed to create excitement and participation: Open Debates, Slam Poetry, Guerilla Theatre, Competitions, Voting events, Flash-mob event ideas, Film Festival, ChangeMakers, etc.
  • Impact Assessment Report: templates for collecting feedback on all aspects of the campaign, and extracting data that demonstrates the impact of the campaign.


It’s Customizable.

While there are currently more than 20 posters with different messages, there may still be issues on your campus not addressed by the campaign.

In which case, we can:

  • create new Posters, or revise the current Posters and Leaflet - resulting in a customized campaign designed to address your unique needs and give your campaign more impact.
  • offer more than 50 images to choose from - for inclusion in the Posters and Leaflets - so you get the look that’s right for your campus.

We can also brand the campaign to:

  • include the Name and Logo of the participating College or Organisation; and
  • include contact Telephone Numbers on the Posters, Leaflet and other campaign elements.

It’s Positive and Inclusive.

The Consent is Sexy Campaign:

  • promotes informed choices based on Consent, Respect and Open Discussion - free of coercion, fear and violence
  • is sex-positive - it does not encourage anyone not to have sex. And it doesn't encourage to have sex. It only encourages those who want to have sex to be sure they have their partner’s consent
  • strives to speak equally to men and women - by recognising the right to respect and consent for both sexes
  • doesn't demonize men: it avoids focussing on men as the only gender capable of abusive behaviour, by recognising that both men and women can be abused - and abusers
  • contributes positively to the sexual health and emotional well-being of all students, by offering information which focuses on benefits and risks, rather than prescriptive moralising and finger-wagging.

It’s Affordable.

  • Because of economies of scale and a high degree of volunteer student participation in the campaign production and roll-out, the CIS Campaign is available at a fraction of the cost of an institution creating and producing their own campaign.
  • The Campaign is charged on a sliding scale dependent on a college’s overall campaign budget. This results in a fair rate - a college with a smaller budget will pay less than a college with a larger budget.
  • It is the vision of the CIS Campaign that no one be turned away because of limited funding - every effort will be made to accommodate the budget of all who wish to participate.

It’s Collaborative.

  • All the poster and leaflet messages and images in the CIS Campaign are tested in focus groups during the Skills Training Workshop - and can then be revised to better address the unique issues of each participating institution. This collaborative process keeps the campaign messages real and relevant for each campus.
  • By collaborating on campaign content; creating and producing events; planning and rolling-out the campaign - students ‘take ownership’ of the campaign - a vital process for a successful campaign.


It’s Engaging.

  • The CIS Posters and Leaflet encourage enquiry and open discussion by inviting students to question negative attitudes and behaviour and to discuss these issues with partners and friends. This is a necessary process for a shift in attitudes and a resultant change in behaviour to occur.
  • The CIS Interactive Events are designed to make messages impactful and memorable, and to engage and stimulate exploration and discussion.

It’s Sustainable.

  • The CIS Campaign includes workshops designed to sensitise and train students in the skills needed to extend the campaign beyond the campaign awareness period.
  • Students will be shown how to create events themed to the campaign messages of consent and respect - so that the campaign can be sustained throughout the year.

It’s Flexible

  • It can be a small campaign: a concerned group of students who want to raise awareness by putting up Posters at their High School or College.
  • Or it can be a large campaign: Workshops, Information & Promotional Campaign, Interactive Events, and Assessment & Impact Report for a College campus of 30 000 or more students.

 


 

What does Consent is Sexy Cost?

  • Because of economies of scale and a high degree of volunteer student participation in the campaign production and roll-out, the CIS Campaign is available at a fraction of the cost of an institution creating and producing their own campaign.
  • The Campaign is charged on a sliding scale - calculated as a percentage of a College’s total campaign budget. This results in a fair rate - a College with a smaller budget will pay less than a College with a larger budget.
  • It is the vision of the CIS Campaign that no one will be turned away because of limited funding - every effort will be made to accommodate the budget of all who wish to participate.


What is the Approach of Consent is Sexy?

The Consent is Sexy Campaign is positive and inclusive:

  • It promotes informed choices based on Consent, Respect and Open Discussion - free of coercion, fear and violence.
  • It's sex-positive - it doesn't encourage anyone not to have sex. And it doesn't encourage anyone to have sex. It only encourages those who want to have sex to be sure they have their partner’s consent.
  • It strives to speak equally to men and women - by recognising theright to respectand consent for both sexes.
  • It does not demonize men: it avoids focussing on men as the only gender capable of abuse, by recognising that both men and women can be abused and abusers.
  • It contributes positively to the sexual health and emotional well-being of all students, by offering information which focuses on benefits and risks, rather than prescriptive moralising and finger-wagging.
  • It's collaborative - through a process of testing, feedback and revision - it keeps the campaign messages real and relevant for each campus.

  • It's engaging - the Posters encourage enquiry, and the Events are designed to make messages impactful and memorable, and to stimulate exploration and discussion.

  • It's do-it-yourself - designed to be run by students for students. The Skills Training Workshop - facilitated by prepared students - trains volunteers to test, assess and revise the Campaign messages; create and produce Events; and to plan and roll-out the Campaign.

How is Consent is Sexy Customizable?

While there are currently more than twenty different posters, there may still be issues on your campus not addressed by the campaign. In which case, we can:

  • create new Posters, or revise the current Posters and Leaflet - resulting in a customized campaign designed to address your unique needs and give your campaign more impact.
  • offer more than 50 images to choose from - for inclusion in the Posters and Leaflet  - so you get the look that's right for your campus.

We can also brand the campaign to:

  • include the Name and Logo of the participating College or Organisation
  • include contact Telephone Numbers on the Posters, Leaflet and other campaign elements.


Why is Testing important?

 All the campaign materials are tested in student focus groups as part of the Skills Training Workshop. This is an important process for three reasons:

  • through testing, a consensus is reached on the campaign content - unaddressed issues are identified; revisions decided upon, images chosen; events created and planned; roles and responsibilities decided.
  • students are sensitized by campaign messages they are exposed to in testing - and as a result, becoming more aware, respectful and caring - which is beneficial for team-building. Organisers of the campaign should 'walk their talk', and be good role models of the principles of the campaign.
  • this collaborative, consultative process also serves to generate a sense of ownership of the campaign for students - really important for the success of the campaign.
  • testing generates confidence - once the campaign materials have been tested, reviewed and revised where neccessary - everyone can feel confident that the campaign will connect and communicate with it's target audience.


Who Produces the Consent is Sexy Campaign?

The Consent is Sexy Campaign is a partnership between The Participating Institution and Consent is Sexy.

  • Consent is Sexy contributes the campaign materials, guidance and expertise in terms of the CIS Modules. This includes customizing the campaign materials to your requirements and for your approval. We are responsible for supplying these materials to you in electronic format (PDFs) - ready for you to print.
  • The Participating Institution is responsible for printing and producing the campaign materials; running the Workshop; planning, managing and rolling-out the Campaign; and conducting the Impact & Assessment  Report.

Why is the Consent is Sexy Campaign Needed?

United States

When reviewing sexual violence statistics on high school and college campuses, three features stand out:

  • The high incidence of sexual violence: One in Four women and One in Twenty men have an experience of rape, attempted rape or sexual assault during their college years.
  • The low incidence of reporting sexual violence: Less than One in Twenty cases are reported.
  • The low levels of awareness of Sexual Rights: Two in Four high school girls and Three in Four boys believe forced sex is acceptable under some circumstances.

These statistics reflect a potent mix of negative factors: high incidence, amplified by silence, amplified by ignorance of sexual rights.

It’s not surprising that sexual violence on college campuses has been descibed as the ‘silent epidemic’.


The statistics below are extracted from various polls taken with students at colleges across the US:

  • More than One in Ten college women are stalked in an academic year, each episode lasting an average of 60 days.
  • More than Four in Ten college men conceded to using coercive behavior to have sex - including ignoring a woman's protest, using physical aggression, and forcing intercourse - but would not concede that it was rape, even though the sex was not consensual.
  • One in Three rape survivors are first year students, 19 years old and younger.
  • One in Two reported rapes were raped in the student’s college residence.
  • Among college women, Nine in Ten victims of rape and sexual assault know their offender.
  • Alcohol or drugs are involved in Three in Four of all sexual assaults.
  • One in Three college men report they would rape if they could be assured they wouldn’t be caught.
  • In a survey of incoming college freshmen (first year students), more than Two in Four women and Three in Four men - believe forced sex was acceptable in certain situations.

         Why do college men rape? here
         Sources for statistics
here


Canada

  • Four in Five female undergraduates surveyed at Canadian universities said they had been victims of violence in a dating relationship.
  • More than One in Three women have experienced sexual assault, including rape.
  • Three in Five reported rapes are date rapes.
  • More than One in Two college-aged males indicated they would commit sexual assault if they were certain they would not get caught.
  • One in Five young women in high school had experienced at least one form of assault in a dating relationship.
  • Eight in Ten women report having experienced sexual harassment.
  • Eight in Ten female students said they had been sexually harassed at school.
  • Less than One in Sixteen women report sexual assaults.

         Sources for statistics here


United Kingdom

  • One in Four women and One in Thirty men experience sexual assault, including rape, at sometime in their lifetime.
  • More than One in Five young women and nearly One in Twelve young men have experienced sexual abuse before the age of 18.
  • More than One in Two rapes are committed by a woman’s current or former partner.
  • Three in Five female rape victims identify their experience as ‘rape’. Women who were sexually assaulted by either a current partner or a date were the least likely to say they had been the victim of a crime.
  • More than One in Four said a women was responsible for being raped if she was wearing sexy or revealing clothing.
  • Nearly One in Three said a woman was partially or totally responsible for being raped if she was drunk.
  • More than One in Three said a woman is partially or totally responsible for being raped if she has behaved in a flirtatious manner.

         Sources for statistics here


Europe

  • An analysis of ten separate domestic violence prevalence studies by the Council of Europe showed consistent findings: One in Four women experience domestic violence over their lifetimes.
  • Where there are statistics available for college student populations in European countries - similar patterns to general populations are prevalent.

         Source for statistic here  


Australia

  • More than Eight in Ten college women and nearly One in Two college men report at least one sexual harassment experience.
  • Nearly Three in Five college women and One in Four college men report at least one sexual assault experience.
  • More than One in Three college women and more than One in Seven college men report at least one unwanted penetrative sex experience.
  • More than One in Four college women and nearly One in Ten college men have experienced unwanted sexual touching experience.
  • More than Eight in Ten sexual assaults are not reported.
  • Since 1995 the number of sexual assaults reported has been steadily increasing by 4% each year on average.
  • Three in Four students say they sometimes or always feel unsafe on campus at night.
  • One in Five women have experienced sexual violence since the age of 15. Due to a low awareness of what constitutes sexual assault, some estimates suggest this statistic is closer to One in Three.
  • Nearly One in Three 15 year old boys believe that forced intercourse is OK if the girl has “led him on”, while One in Five were unsure.
  • Nearly One in Three 15-25 year old boys and men believe that forced sex is OK in certain situations.
  • Nearly One in Five men say that “women often say No when they mean Yes”.
  • One in Six men say that “women who are raped often ask for it”.

        Sources for statistics here


South Africa

  • More than One in Three women have experienced sexual assault, including rape.
  • One in Thirty Five rapes are reported.
  • One in Two women report a lifetime history of physical or sexual assault, including rape, by their male partners.
  • One in Four women report that their first sexual experience was forced.
  • Four in Ten pregnancies are teenagers.

 


 

Sources quoted for sexual assault statistics given in above are the following:


United States

  • Foubert, J.  The Men’s Program: How to Successfully Lower Men’s Likelihood of Raping. Holmes Beach, FL: Learning Publications, Inc. 2000.
  • Karjane, H.K., Fisher, B.S., and Cullen F.T. (2002) Campus Sexual Assault: How America’s Institutions of Higher Education Respond.
  • Newton, MA: Education Development Center, Inc. Final Report, NIJ Grant #1999-WA-VX-0008.
  • Ottens, A.J. and Hotelling, K. (2001) Sexual Violence On Campus: Policies, Programs, and Perspectives. New York: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Grants to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women on Campus. US Dept of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Violence Against Women Office. 2002.
  • Douglas, K. A. et al. Results From the 1995 National College Health Risk.
  • Journal of American College Health 46 (1997): 55-66. Behavior Survey.
  • Bonnie S. Fisher, Francis T. Cullen, Michael G. Turner. The Sexual Victimization of College Women. Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2000.
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Adolescence. (1994). Sexual assault and the adolescent. Pediatrics, 94(5), 761-765.
  • National Victim Center and Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center. (1992). Rape in America: A report to the nation. Charleston, SC: University of South Carolina.
  • Hirsch, Kathleen (1990) Fraternities of Fear: Gang Rape, Male Bonding, and the Silencing of Women. Ms., 1(2) 52-56.
  • Miller, Ted, Mark A. Cohen, & Brian Wierama. Victim costs and consequences: A new look. 1996. Washington, DC: U.S. Department. of Justice, National Institute of Justice.
  • Kirkland, Connie J. (1994). Academic impact of sexual assault. Fairfax, VA: George Mason University.
  • Andrea Parrot, Laurie Bechhofer, editors. Acquaintance Rape: The Hidden Crime; Wiley Series on Personality Processes. 1991.

Canada

  • Johnson and Sacco. Statistics Canada. 1995
  • W. DeKeseredy and K.Kelly. The Incidence and Prevalence of Woman Abuse in Canadian University and College Dating Relationships: Results from a National Survey. 1993.
  • Isely & Hehrenbech-Shim. Scarce. 1997.
  • Statistics Canada: Violence Against Women Survey. November, 1993.
  • Shirley Mercer. Not a Pretty Picture: An Exploratory Study of Violence Against Women in Dating Relationships. Toronto, 1987.
  • The Joke’s Over – Student to Student Sexual Harassment in Secondary Schools. The Ontario Women’s Directorate, The Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation and the Ministry of Education, 1995.

United Kingdom

  • Cross Government Action Plan on Sexual Violence and Abuse. 2007.
  • Walby and Allen, 2004.
  • Kelly, Regan and Burton. Survey of Further Education Colleges, Britain. 1991.
  • British Crime Survey Home Office Research, Development and Statistics. 2009.
  • Amnesty International UK. 2005.

Australia

  • Survey by The National Union of Students (NUS). National survey on women student's safety. 2010.
  • Australian Institute of Criminology. 2006.
  • ABS Personal Safety Survey. 2005.
  • The Women's Safety Survey. ABS. 1996.
  • Unwanted Sexual Experiences Survey with three inner city university campuses in Adelaide (Yarrow Place, 2000)
  • Lievore. 2003.

South Africa

  • The Medical Research Council of South Africa.
  • Kristin Dunkle, Rachel Jewkes, Heather Brown, James McIntyre, Glenda Gray, Siobán Harlow. A Technical Report to the Australian Agency for International Development. 2003.
  • People Opposing Women Abuse.
  • Glantz 1995
  • Klugman. Report by Women's Health Project. 1992.

What is the Impact of Sexual Assault?

 Physical and emotional trauma results from sexual assault:

  • Four in Ten rape survivors develop sexually transmitted diseases as a result of sexual assault.
  • Eight in Ten rape survivors suffer chronic physical or psychological problems over time.
  • Rape survivors are Six Times more likely to attempt suicide than are victims of other crimes.
  • Four in Ten sexual assault survivors seek mental health treatment as a result of the assault.
  • Intimate partner violence is the leading cause of injury to women.

In addition to physical and emotional damage, college students who have been victims of sexual assault suffer from a host of problems that impede their academic achievement:

  • In nearly every case, victims cannot perform at the same academic levels that they did prior to the attack.
  • Sexual assault sometimes causes students to be unable to carry a normal class load, and they miss classes more frequently. This is often a result of social withdrawal or a way to avoid seeing the perpetrator.
  • Student victims regularly withdraw from courses altogether.

 


 

What are the Legal Obligations of Colleges?

  • Colleges have a legal obligation to educate students of known risks and to provide reasonable protection and awareness programs. If a crime is foreseeable, then a college can be held liable for not sufficiently protecting against it.
  • Date rape - not stranger rape - is the most common violent crime on college campuses. If date rapes occur at predictable times and places, the school must make reasonable efforts to prevent a recurrence; and the school may be liable if it fails to deal effectively with repeat student offenders, including rapists, whose conduct eventually results in more damage.
  • Increased reporting - even anonymous reporting - may push colleges to further invest in more effective acquaintance rape prevention. The more that date and acquaintance rape remains a hidden crime, the less incentive that schools have to invest sufficiently in its prevention.
  • Stranger rape results in dramatic and unwelcome publicity for colleges. Administrators try to prevent stranger rape by putting cameras in parking garages, running late-night student escort and/or shuttle services, deploying student patrols, placing emergency telephones throughout campus, locking buildings to prevent strangers from entering, trimming obstructive foliage, and improving the lighting in dark or less-traveled areas. The costs of these prevention initiatives far exceed the dollars spent on acquaintance rape prevention, even though date rape is a much more likely occurrence.

Source: Rana Sampson, sponsoring agency: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, US Dept of Justice.


 

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